WASHTENAW COUNTY <br>TRIAL COURT

Washtenaw County Trial Court
101 E. Huron St., PO Box 8645
Ann Arbor, MI 48107-8645
(734) 222-3270
tcadmin@ewashtenaw.org

 

Performance Measures

At-A-Glance Performance Measures:

Case Filings Graph
This graph represents new cases that were filed in the Trial Court annually from 2006 through 2013. These cases include cases in the Juvenile, Probate, Civil – Divorce and Criminal (felony) divisions of the Trial Court. The Trial Court is a court of general jurisdiction but by law not all types of cases can be filed in the Trial Court. Some case types are required to be filed in a District Court or a Federal Court, for example, and other cases would not meet the Trial Court’s jurisdictional requirements. The Felony and Juvenile Delinquency data illustrates cases filed and should not be used as a measure of the crime rate in Washtenaw County. 

For an overview of the Michigan Judicial System, please click on the following link
http://courts.mi.gov/Administration/SCAO/Resources/Documents/Publications/pamphlets/onecourt.pdf

Jury Utilization Graph
Typically, the Washtenaw County Circuit Court will summons 170 jurors for each Monday.  There are weeks that we call-in all 170 of those jurors and also some weeks we do not call-in any jurors because all of our jury trials for that week have been resolved.  The actual number of jurors we call-in each week is solely dependent upon how many cases are expected to go to jury trial on a particular Monday morning. 

When a jury is needed on a Monday morning, the jury supervisor sends anywhere between 20-35 jurors to a courtroom, depending on the type of case that is being heard.  Prospective jurors can be removed from a panel by either side of a case for a variety of reasons. Felony criminal cases will normally keep a jury panel of 14 members until both sides have rested their case and it is time for the jury to deliberate.  Once deliberations begin, two of the jurors will be excused so that 12 of the 14 are finding the verdict for that case. Mental Health, Juvenile and Civil cases will keep a panel of 8 jurors and do not typically call off any of the jurors at time of deliberation.


This graph represents how quickly civil cases are being disposed of within the Trial Court, in relation to the Caseflow Management Guidelines promulgated by the Supreme Court Administrators Office (SCAO). The guidelines set parameters for how quickly civil cases should be resolved. Various factors go into the resolution of a case and everyone from the attorneys, the parties, judges and court staff play an important role in reaching these benchmarks. This graph measures the adjudication progress pursuant to the SCAO guidelines;
Civil Proceedings. 75% of all cases should be adjudicated within 364 days from the date of case filing and 100% within 728 days.

This graph represents how quickly criminal cases are being disposed of within the Trial Court, in relation to the Caseflow Management Guidelines promulgated by the Supreme Court Administrators Office (SCAO). The guidelines set parameters for how quickly criminal cases should be resolved. Various factors go into the resolution of a case and everyone from the attorneys, the parties, judges and court staff play an important role in reaching these benchmarks.

This graph measures the adjudication progress pursuant to the SCAO guidelines; Criminal Proceedings. 90% of all felony cases should be adjudicated within 91 days from the date of entry of the order binding the defendant over to the circuit court; 98% within 154 days; and 100% within 301 days. Incarcerated persons should be afforded priority for trial.

This graph represents how quickly divorce cases where minor children are involved are being disposed of within the Trial Court, in relation to the Caseflow Management Guidelines promulgated by the Supreme Court Administrators Office (SCAO). The guidelines set parameters for how quickly these types of divorce cases should be resolved. Various factors go into the resolution of a case and everyone from the attorneys, the parties, judges and court staff play an important role in reaching these benchmarks. This graph measures the adjudication progress pursuant to the SCAO guidelines;
Divorce With Children. 90% of all divorce cases with children should be adjudicated within 301 days from the date of case filing and 100% within 364 days.

This graph represents how quickly divorce cases where no minor children are involved are being disposed of within the Trial Court, in relation to the Caseflow Management Guidelines promulgated by the Supreme Court Administrators Office (SCAO). The guidelines set parameters for how quickly these types of divorce cases should be resolved. Various factors go into the resolution of a case and everyone from the attorneys, the parties, judges and court staff play an important role in reaching these benchmarks. This graph measures the adjudication progress pursuant to the SCAO guidelines;
Divorce Without Children. 90% of all divorce cases without children should be adjudicated within 182 days from the date of case filing and 100% within 364 days.

This graph represents annual revenue that the Trial Court collected from 2008 through 2013. The revenue depicted here is the combined revenue from the Probate, Juvenile, Domestic, Civil and Criminal divisions. Some of the revenue that the Trial Court collects is held and then ‘passed-through’ to victims of crimes in the form of restitution, or to defendants in the form of bond returns. Other revenue is collected and ‘passed-through’ to the State of Michigan in accordance with state law. However, this graph only describes that revenue which is actually kept by Washtenaw County.


Chart (1) shows annual support obligations and collections for each year from 2009-2013. Chart (2) shows collections as a percentage of obligations. Together, these charts show the numbers behind our performance on collections as a percentage of obligations, the key federal incentive performance measure regarding FOC collections. Two trends are apparent: (a) decrease in total dollars obligated and total dollars collected and (b) increase in collections as a percentage of obligations. Because obligations are declining much faster than collections, the net effect is an increase in dollars collected as a percentage of obligations. The decrease in overall obligations can be attributed to trends in the economy, the trend for high income/obligation cases to opt out of the system (opt out cases are not included in our collection statistics), and to FOC’s increased efficiency in “right sizing” orders. That is, orders that were charging more than was appropriate given the payer’s income have been adjusted to better reflect (generally lower) incomes. Because obligations are declining much faster than collections, the net effect is an increase in dollars collected as a percentage of obligations.
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